Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Review: Burning Midnight

Burning Midnight
by Will McIntosh

The Goodreads Summary Says:   
Sully is a sphere dealer at a flea market. It doesn’t pay much—Alex Holliday’s stores have muscled out most of the independent sellers—but it helps him and his mom make the rent. No one knows where the brilliant-colored spheres came from. One day they were just there, hidden all over the earth like huge gemstones. Burn a pair and they make you a little better: an inch taller, skilled at math, better-looking. The rarer the sphere, the greater the improvement—and the more expensive the sphere.

When Sully meets Hunter, a girl with a natural talent for finding spheres, the two start searching together. One day they find a Gold—a color no one has ever seen. And when Alex Holliday learns what they have, he will go to any lengths, will use all of his wealth and power, to take it from them.

There’s no question the Gold is priceless, but what does it actually do? None of them is aware of it yet, but the fate of the world rests on this little golden orb. Because all the world fights over the spheres, but no one knows where they come from, what their powers are, or why they’re here.


I Say:
3 stars

Burning Midnight by Will McIntosh was a unique read. It's set in an alternate present where people buy and sell mysterious spheres to get an extra boost - better memory, straighter teeth, increased height, etc. The world falls into three camps when it comes to the spheres: take advantage of all you can; ain't nobody got money for that; and apprehension that the spheres are too good to be true. Sully, the main character, falls into the second camp. He's 17, selling spheres to get by, and trying to best the young, rich business mogul who's duped him in the past. When Sully and a (bit stereotypical) friend named Hunter find a previously undiscovered type of sphere, the story really begins.

I'll say up front that I had difficulty with the first half of the book. The pacing felt off, and the characters were a bit simplistic and naive in a way that reminded me more of Middle Grade than YA. The pop culture references occasionally felt like an attempt to mention what "the kids" are into these days. I would almost recommend reading the book's synopsis and then picking it up right around the halfway point, as the first half doesn't give the best impression of the potential the second half has.

But I enjoyed the second half quite a bit more. McIntosh does a great job writing suspense and action, and it was hard to put the book down once the plot really got going. The story took some very unexpected turns, reminding me of a cross between an M Night Shyamalan movie and Rob Wells' Variant/Feedback duology. It was just really different. Although the ending was very tidy, I enjoyed the way the story took me by surprise.

Just So You Know:
I received a free review copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Burning Midnight will be available February 2.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Little Women Read Along


I've never read Little Women, but I had a roommate in college who loved the book. I think I fell asleep through the movie once? Also in college.

But some of my favorite bloggers, Suey, Jenni, and Kami are hosting a Little Women read along beginning in February. Time for me to give it a go!



Here's the schedule:

Chapters 1-17 from February 1-10: Discussion post Feb. 10 on Suey's blog
(Twitter chat Feb. 10 at 7:00 pm Mountain.)
Chapters 18-33 from February 11-19: Discussion post Feb. 19 on Kami's blog
(Twitter Chat: Feb. 19 at 7:00 pm Mountain.)
Chapters 34-49 from February 20-29: Discussion post on Feb. 29 on Jenni's blog
(Twitter Chat: Feb. 29 at 7:00 pm Mountain.)

Want to join? Sign up here.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Best Books of 2015

The Top Ten Tuesday topic is Best Books of 2015, my favorite one of the year. This is my list, in no particular order.

Winter by Marissa Meyer
Is it ridiculously long? Absolutely. But the ending. The ending, you guys. It couldn't be better.

Mosquitoland by David Arnold
Quirky and funny and so unique. This is the weirdest book I loved this year.
 
A Thousands Pieces of You and Ten Thousand Skies Above You by Claudia Gray
Alternate dimensions + mystery + swoon + cliffhanger = awesomeness

Simon vs. the homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Alvertalli
Funny and cute

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
I can't decide if this book is really insightful or really problematic, but either way I think it raises a lot of great topics for discussion.

Kissing Ted Callahan by Amy Spalding
This book was so silly and fun.

Not in the Script by Amy Finnegan
Lots of cute banter and an inside look into TV shows. Adored this one, and it's the squeaky-cleanest book on my list.

Wonder by RJ Palacio
This MG book deserves all the hype. It was really touching.

A Couple of Boys have the Best Week Ever by Marla Frazee
This is a children's book and it's genius.

What were some of your favorites this year?